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Dear Students,

Aptitudetests4me is a comprehensive portal which gives you all types of aptitude tests at one place and that too with solution explained in detail. Here you will find more than 5000 questions on various aspects of aptitude tests and all the tests are free.

The importance of aptitude tests is evident from the fact that all the exams world wide have some sort of aptitude tests built in their competitive exams. Aptitude tests are integral part of all the jobs offered through exams. Aptitude tests are popularly known as jobtestprep or assesmentday also. Most of the major international tests like GMAT, GRE, ACT, SAT, LSAT, MCAT etc. have questions primarily on aptitude tests.

Generally it is thought that aptitude tests consists of logical problems, reasoning tests and some quantitative aptitude. But actually it is much more.

Aptitude tests check the entire personality of a candidate by way of checking his ability to think, reason, derive meaningful information from the data, verbal, non verbal and numerical ability and quantitative aptitude.

Here, we divide all sorts of aptitude tests into 8 parts:

1. Passage Reading, 2. Verbal Logic, 3. Non Verbal Logic, 4. Numerical Logic, 5. Data Interpretation, 6. Reasoning, 7. Analytical Ability and 8. Quantitative Aptitude.

Now we will see each of the topic in detail:

1. Passage Reading: Passage reading is an important aspect of all the tests. From the beginning of your studies English text books are a part of curriculum of of all the schools. A student while studying is expected to read a chapter and understand it and eventually be able to answer the questions based on that chapter. A person should have good command over comprehension by way of good knowledge of vocabulary and sentence formation. Thus in this type of question one short passage is given and certain questions are asked on the basis of it. For tips and tricks on solving Passage reading and English comprehension questions read more...


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2. Verbal Logic:Verbal logic questions deal with alphabets, letters, words etc. The questions are on letter series, letter and mumber mixed series, analogy, classification, coding and decoding, matching of pairs, finding a word not belonging to others etc. For tips and tricks on solving Verbal Logic questions read more...


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3. Non Verbal Logic:Non verbal logic questions forms an integral part of all the exams. These are non verbal tests and are basically designed to test your abilities in discerning patterns, arranging figures into patterns or spotting analogies.

These tests can be classified into the following four major categories.

(a) Series Completion: In this category of question, there are two sets of figures. One set is called problem figures and the other is called answer figures. Problem set figures are arranged in a kind of series. One figure from the answer set will continue the series as it appears in the problem set.

(b) Spotting Analogies: In this category of questions there is a defined relationship between the first and second figure. A similar relationship is to be established between the third and the fourth figure which is to be selected from the answer set.

(c) Odd Man Out: In this category of question the problem set itself serves as the the answer set. Out of the four figures given in the problem set, three are similar in a certain way, while one is different.

(d) Arranging the Sequence: In this category of question two figures are jumbled which when rearranged make a meaningful series. For tips and tricks on solving Non Verbal Logic questions read more...


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4. Numerical Logic: The questions on numerical logic primarily consist of number or number and alphabet series in which you have to discern a particular pattern and accordingly find the next number or number and alphabet or pairs of numbers. There could also be a number series in which you have to find the odd man out or find out the wrong number in the sequence. There could be questions on coding and decoding in which a number represents a particular alphabet and accordingly words are to be formed corresponding to a particular mumber series. For tips and tricks on solving Numerical Logic questions read more...


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5. Data Interpretation: The meaning of data interpretation is the technique of interpreting the given data either in the form of tables or in the form of diagram or chart. The technique requires the ability to reason with the numbers given in tables and diagrams containing the numbers. You will be required to do rapid calculation by using your skill in arithmetical operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication , division), calculation of percentages, calculation of averages. Data interpretation assumes great significance as a higher management technique for quick decision making involving large data say, population of different countries represented in a pie chart, crime rates of different cities represented in bar chart, Export of a particular commodity by different countries in a bar chart, Growth of a particular country over a period of years in line graph, marks obtained by a student in different subjects in bar chart etc. The questions on data interpretation are asked mainly in four forms, Table charts, Bar graphs, Pie charts and Line graphs. For For tips and tricks on solving Data Interpretation questions read more...


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6. Reasoning: Reasoning is an important part of all the competitive examinations world wide. The various questions on reasoning consist of ranking problems, taller-shorter relationships, family relationship problems direction sense type problems, coding-decoding problems, analogy, problems based on calendar, statements and conclusion problems, A paragraph and then several statements and questions for which answers are to be deduced from the statements, A paragraph and then some statements are given and you are to tell whether they are true, false or cannot say, Three statements type problems in which it is asked if the first two statements are true then the third statement is true, false or uncertain, Some facts are given and then you are asked which statement must be true based on those facts, For tips and tricks on solving Reasoning questions read more...


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7. Analytical Ability: Analytical Ability problems are somewhat related to Reasoning type problems but they require a deeper analysis than simple reasoning problems.

Some of the formats of the questions on analytical ability are as follows:

The logic problems present you with three true statements: Fact 1, Fact 2, and Fact 3. Then, you are given three more statements (labeled I, II, and III), and you must determine which of these, if any, is also a fact. One or two of the statements could be true; all of the statements could be true; or none of the statements could be true. Choose your answer based solely on the information given in the first three facts.

The questions involve analytical reasoning better known as “logic games”. These games give the most trouble to students who haven’t defined a specific method for solving these problems. The best way to attack logic games is to have a plan.When solving the problems in this set, try the following strategy:

1. Know the rules of the logic game and what each rule means.
2. Draw up an easy-to-reference diagram that includes all of the game’s information.
3. Look for common elements in the rules; you can combine these to make deductions.
4. Read the questions carefully; be sure you know what is being asked before you try to answer the question.

Some logical reasoning questions ask you to determine the method the speaker is using when he or she presents the argument. Method-of-argument questions ask you to demonstrate an understanding of how a speaker’s argument is put together. To determine the method of argument, again focus on the conclusion and on the evidence presented.What method does the speaker use to link the two?

The questions contain short logic problems. Each problem consists of three statements. Based on the first two statements, the third statement may be true, false, or uncertain. Logic problems may appear daunting at first. However, solving these problems can be done in the most straightforward way. Simply translate the abstract relationships in the questions into real-world relationships, so you can see the facts more clearly. For example, if the problem is comparing the ages of three people, make a chart and list the names of the people and their possible ages according to the information given. Or, create a diagram using symbols to represent phrases like “older than” or “greater than.”

A typical logical reasoning question presents an argument and asks you to analyze it. You may be asked to draw further conclusions from the argument, determine what strengthens or weakens the argument, find flaws in the argument, or justify the argument. Success with these types of questions depends on your being able to understand the structure of the argument. Remember that every argument has a point of view. Every argument draws a conclusion and is generally supported with evidence. Study each passage to determine how each sentence contributes to the argument the speaker is trying to make. Then make sure you understand the question that is being asked before you choose from the five answer options.

Some questions ask you to match definitions to particular situations. For each question, you will be given a definition and four possible answer choices. You have to read each definition and all four choices carefully, and find the answer that provides the best example of the given definition. Answer each question solely on the basis of the definition given.

A small paragraph is given and then you have to tell which statement is best supported by that paragraph.

A small paragraph is given and then you have to tell which of the following four statement would make the speaker’s argument stronger.

Questions on some words translated from an artificial language: Certain statements are given which assign artifical language to some sentences and based on those sentences a new sentence is formed and you have to assign the artificial language to it.

The questions ask you to match definitions to particular situations. For each question, you will be given a definition and four possible answer choices. Read each definition and all four choices carefully, and find the answer that provides the best example of the given definition. Answer each question solely on the basis of the definition given.

The questions contain a short paragraph, and each paragraph presents an argument. Your task is to read the paragraph carefully and determine the main point the author is trying to make. What conclusion can be drawn from the argument? Each paragraph is followed by four statements.One statement supports the author’s argument better than the others do. The best way to approach these questions is to first read the paragraph and then restate the author’s main argument, or conclusion, in your own words.

Statement and Conclusions type problems: A statement is given and then two conclusions are given. You have to tell whether Only conclusion I follows or Only conclusion II follows or Either I or II follows or Neither I nor II follows.

Statement and Arguments type problems: A statement is given and then two arguments are given. You have to tell whether Only argument I is strong or Only argument II is strong or Either I or II is strong or Neither I nor II is strong.

Cause and effect type problems: Two statements numbered I and II are given. There may be cause and effect relationship between the two statements. These two statements may be the effect of the same cause or independent causes. These statements may be independent causes without having any relationship. You have to find which statement is the cause and which statement is the effect.

Statements and course of Action type problems: A statement is given and then two courses of action are given. You have to tell whether Only I course of action follows or Only II course of action follows or Either I or II course of action follows or Neither I nor II course of action follows.

For tips and tricks on solving Analytical Ability questions read more...


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8. Basic Numeracy: Basic Numeracy or Quantitative Aptitude is an essential part of aptitude tests. It tests your ability to solve simple arithmetic and calculation abilities. Here questions range from a wide range of topics like Negative Numbers, Rules for Adding Odd and Even Numbers, Decimal Number Operations, Round off Numbers, Square Root, Reading the Whole Number, Unit Conversion -- Length, Mass & Volume, Unit Conversion -- Speed, Power & Temperature, Rules for Fractions, Reducing to Lowest Term, Improper & Mixed Fraction, Decimal, Fraction & Percentage.

Whole numbers and their basic properties, Decimals, whole numbers, and exponents, Fractions, Geometry, Percent and probability, Integers, Metric units and measurement, Introduction to algebra, Positive and negative numbers.

Adding/subtracting decimals, Multiplying decimals, Dividing decimals, Percent, Exponents, Square roots, Signed integers, Multiplying and dividing integers, Properties of integers, Ratios and Proportions, Distance, rates, and time, Similar figures, Factoring, Factors and multiples, Greatest common factor (GCF), Least common multiple (LCM), Fractions, Reducing fractions, Mixed Numbers.

Percents, Fractions, Factors and Greatest Common Factors, Multiples and Least Common Multiples, Prime and Composite Numbers, Divisibility Tests, Exponents, Patterns and Exponents, Circumference & Area of Circles, Perimeter & Area of Polygons.

Time, speed and distance, Simple interest, Compound interest, Partnership, Pipes and cisterns, Height and distance, Volume and surface area, ratio and proportion, Profit and Loss, Stocks and Shares, partnership, Income tax, Insurance, Simple interest and Compound interest, Boats and streams, races and games, discount, profit and loss, Problem on ages, Time and work, Permutation and combination etc. For tips and tricks on solving quantitative aptitude questions read more...


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